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Question of the day
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Question of the Day (04-Jun-19)

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The German name has largely ousted the original English name marchpane with the same apparent derivation: "March bread". Marzapane is documented earlier in Italian than in any other language, and the sense "bread" for pan is Roman. The origin could be from the Latin term "martius panis", which means bread of march. However, the ultimate etymology is unclear; for example, the Italian word derives from the Latin words "Massa" (itself from Greek Μάζα "Maza") meaning pastry and "Pan" meaning bread, this can be particularly seen in the Provençal massapan, the Portuguese maçapão (where 'ç' is an alternative form for the phoneme 'ss') and old Spanish mazapan - the change from 'ss' to 'z' in Latin words was common in old Spanish and the 'r' appeared later. Though, it could also be derived from martis pan, bread of March.

Which of the following cannot be inferred from the passage?
  1. “Massa”, “martius”, “martis” all mean the same thing – March.
  2. In Portuguese, it is normal to replace ‘ss’ with ‘ç’.
  3. In Old Spanish, it was commonplace to change “massapan” to “mazapan”.
  4. The universal explanation for the name seems to be that it has been derived from the German name.

OPTIONS
 
 1)I and II
 2)II and III
 3)III and IV
 4)I and III
 5)I and IV

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