Alternatively, you can register/login faster using
 
Register Free!
  QUESTION OF THE DAY  
Question of the day
HOME > MBA PREP CENTRE > DAILY TEST PREP > QUESTION OF THE DAY
      
 
Question of the Day (04-Feb-19)

Views : 153
Not yet rated
 
Another virtually insurmountable problem facing the translator is how to deal with the author's intentional use of ambiguous terms or of words that have several meanings. One such instance is found in the first sentence of The Metamorphosis. English translators have often sought to render the word Ungeziefer as "insect"; in Middle German, however, Ungeziefer literally means "unclean animal not suitable for sacrifice" and is sometimes used colloquially to mean "bug"- a very general term, unlike the scientific sounding "insect". Kafka had no intention of labeling Gregor, the protagonist of the story, as any specific thing, but instead wanted to convey Gregor's disgust at his transformation. Another example is Kafka's use of the German noun Verkehr in the final sentence of The Judgment. Literally, Verkehr means "intercourse" and, as in English, can have either a sexual or non-sexual meaning; in addition, it is used to mean "transport or traffic". The sentence can be translated as: “At that moment an unending stream of traffic crossed over the bridge.”

Which of the following can be called the biggest problem in translating Kafka’s works?
OPTIONS
 
 1)The word “ungeziefer” can be translated as both- “insect” as well as “unclean animal not suitable for sacrifice”.
 2)Kafka’s intentions with his characters aren’t clearly expressed- this makes translation ambiguous.
 3)Words can mean more than one thing- a detriment that Kafka failed to foresee while writing his novels.
 4)Gregor’s transformation was disgusting- a factor cleverly disguised by the translators.
 5)Kafka’s works were layered with words that could be interpreted in different ways, on purpose.

DiscussGet In Email
 Solution
 



processing   

Loading user comments...
      
 
 
©2008-2019 All rights reserved