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SNAP 2013 Analysis
 

SNAP 2013 Analysis

TestFunda ,  28-Jun-16
The SNAP 2013 exam was similar to SNAP 2012 in terms of difficulty level, except for the General Awareness section which predominantly comprised static GK (like 2011). The overall structure and marking scheme of the exam was the same as the last few years i.e. 150 questions for 180 marks in 120 minutes. As usual, the Logical Reasoning section had the least questions but the maximum marks allotted to it.  

Summary

Number of Sections

4

Options per Question

4

Negative Marking

1/4th of Marks for the Question

Marks per Question

2 per question for LR, 1 per question for remaining sections

Expected Overall Cut-offs

110+ for SIBM-P, 105+ for SCMHRD


1. Logical Reasoning – 30 questions: 

Like every year, the LR section had 30 questions, with 2 marks allotted to each question. The concepts covered in this section were linear and complex arrangements, coded relationships, cubes, coded mathematical operations, letter and number coding, Venn diagrams, analogies, number series, syllogisms etc. Unlike previous SNAP exams, there were no critical reasoning questions in this section this year. The question level breakup of questions is as given below: 

Question Type

Number of Questions

Relationships - Coded

1

Directions

2

Linear Arrangements

2

Complex Arrangements

2

Number Series

2

Letter Coding

1

Number Coding

3

Odd Man Out

1

Coded Mathematical Operations

1

Venn Diagrams

5

Cubes

1

Diagrammatic Numeric Puzzle

1

Miscellaneous puzzle

1

Syllogisms

2

Tables and Caselets

4

Clocks

1


In general, the entire section was simple but the order in which you attempted questions could have helped optimise your available time. The two sets on Venn diagrams (Indians, Americans as well as Sachin, Sourav and Dhoni) and complex arrangements (people, day and dish) were quite simple and could have attempted quickly. The set on people and amounts was easy, provided it was solved using answer options. If solved conventionally, it would have taken some more time. The single questions should have been attempted based on the student’s comfort level and time available. There were two DI sets as well, out of which, the set on 6th, 7th and 8th plan was very simple. On the whole, a student could have attempted 23-25 questions in around 40 minutes with a very high accuracy.  

2. Verbal Ability – 40 questions:
This year’s SNAP did not differ much from previous SNAP papers.  

Question Type

Number of Questions

Reading Comprehension

7

Vocabulary – Synonyms, idioms, odd man out, spellings

 

15

Fill in the blanks

8

Faulty Construction

4

Mark the error

2

Jumbled sentences

2

Parts of Speech

2


The verbal section laid heavy emphasis upon the vocabulary, fill in the blanks and grammar question types. The vocabulary based questions tested concepts pertaining to synonyms, idiomatic usage, spellings and odd man out. Although fill in the blanks tested grammar applications, there was an emphasis on vocabulary. The grammar based questions that required one to select errors were fairly simple. 
The paper comprised two RCs. One of the RCs was based on ill-temper and had four questions out of which two were passage based and two vocabulary-based. Although the subject matter was dense, the questions were very easy. The other RC was based in the context of slavery and had 3 passage based questions, which once again were rather simple.  
There were two questions based on jumbled sentences. While one had five sentences that were to be rearranged, the other had a single sentence jumbled into nine segments. Using options, both questions could have been attempted successfully. 
Overall the difficulty level of this section was easy to moderate. 31-33 attempts in 30 minutes would have been a good attempt.

3. General Knowledge and Current Affairs – 40 questions:

The GK section was a mixed bag, covering topics from business, international organisations, sports, politics, history, science etc. However, unlike last year, there were hardly any questions on current affairs. Also, there was greater emphasis on questions from banking, economics and finance. A well-read student could have easily attempted 15-17 questions in this section. 

4. Quantitative Ability + Data Interpretation – 40 questions:

The Quantitative Ability section was extremely easy with a very high focus on Arithmetic (approximately 60% of the section). A feature of this section was that while it was called the QA+DI+DS section, there were no DS question in the exam and the DI questions were asked in the LR section. 
The overall topic-level breakup of this section is as given below: 

Topic

Number of Questions

Averages

3

Percentages

4

Interest and Growth Rates

1

Profit, Loss and Discount

2

Ratio and Proportion

4

Mixtures and Alligation

1

Time and Distance

6

Time and Work

5

Triangles

2

Number Theory

3

Surds and Indices

1

Logarithms

1

Mensuration

2

Sequences, Progressions & Series

1

Permutations & Combinations

2

Venn Diagrams

2

Within Arithmetic, the focus was on time and distance, time and work, percentages, profit and loss, ratio and proportion and averages. In algebra, numbers (LCM), surds and logarithms (basic properties) were covered while Geometry had questions on triangles (similarity, angles) and mensuration (property of perimeter and area). There was a question on multiple ratios which could have been solved easily by expressing the ratios as a series. There were also a couple of easy P & C questions based on the basic principle of counting and a couple of two-figure Venn diagram questions. 17-18 questions were extremely simple. There were only 6-7 questions that could be classified as time consuming and slightly difficult. The set of 3 questions on tunnel, jackal and cat could have been avoided. On the whole, this was a simple and high-scoring section. A student could have easily attempted 28-32 questions in around 35 minutes. 

Overall, 95+ attempts and a score of 110 or above should be a good score for students applying to SIBM (Pune). For students applying to SCMHRD, 105 or above should be a safe score. The cut-offs should be lower for the remaining Symbiosis institutes. 

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